Banking Cases Litigation

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Our Firm advises its clients on provisions under the Banking Regulation Act, 1949 and notifications issued by the RBI. Our Firm also advises clients on structuring of foreign investments in the banking sector in India including foreign exchange regulations under FEMA.


Services rendered by our Firm in the financial sector include acquisition finance, project finance, legal opinions, drafting escrow, consortium, mortgage, pledge and lien agreements and loan agreements, credit & security documentation. Our Firm also deals in securitization of assets, cases with respect to dishonor of cheques, debentures, guarantees and other forms of securities, etc. Our Firm represents in civil and criminal litigation, consumer matters and arbitration.


Our Firm deals in all matters connected with DRT, ADRT and Securitization Act including drafting of DRT replies, counter-claims, counter-suits, suits, writ petitions, etc.


2) Sworn Statement: At this stage, the complainant needs to enter the witness box and give further details regarding the case. If the magistrate is satisfied that there is some substance in the case of the complainant, then he will issue a summons to the accused.


3) Appearance of Accused: On receipt of summons, the accused need to appear in the court. If he does not appear in the court, the court will issue an arrest warrant against him. After appearance, the accused is supposed to take a bail from the court with or without sureties. If the accused is unable to furnish a surety then he can deposit a cash security, instead of surety. This cash security is refundable to the accused after the conclusion of the case.


4) Recording of Plea: In the next stage, the court will ask the accused as to whether he has committed the offence or not. If the accused admits the guilt, the court will immediately give him punishment. If he pleads innocence, the court will post the matter for evidence.


5) Evidence: The Complainant has to furnish his evidence, normally by way of affidavit; this is known as examination-in-chief. He needs to produce all documents in support of his case like bounced cheque, dishonor memo, copy of notice etc. Later complainant will be cross examined by the accused. If there are other witnesses in support of the complainant, then their evidence also has to be recorded.


6) Statement of the Accused: After the Complainant side evidence is over, the court will put some questions to the accused regarding his guilt. An accused needs to give his version to the same.


7) Defense Evidence: After the Accused statement the court will give an opportunity to the accused to leave his evidence. The accused can also produce documents in support of his case, as well as witnesses in his support. Accused and his witnesses will be cross examined by the complainant. After this, the case is posted for arguments.


Arguments: Both the Complainant and the accused will submit their arguments before the court. They can also furnish judgments of high courts and Supreme Court in support of their case. Normally a written argument containing a gist of the oral argument is also furnished to the court.


9) Judgment: After the arguments, case is posted for judgment. If the court finds that the accused has committed offence, he will be punished with fine or imprisonment. If he is innocent, the court will acquit him. If accused is convicted, then he needs to suspend his sentence, for a period of 30 days with in which time, he can file an appeal before the sessions court.